Practice What You Preach : Executive Coaching Pillars

A coach cannot preach what he does not practice. Personal attributes and soft skills set coaches apart. Hence, it is imperative for a successful executive coach to retain and possess a set of traits that excel him in his line of work.

Awareness: An executive coach has to be self-aware and comprehend how his actions and personality impact others.

Positivity: A coach should embark on an optimist approach on life and business, and transfer it to his client.

Assertiveness and Self-confidence: Executive coaches should be independent, objective, and comfortable with senior management boards.

A genuine motivation to help: Coaches are here to serve business advancement. To do so they should exhibit high interest and respect towards the industry they support, and showcase deep empathy towards their clients. A commendable coach sees coaching as a “mission to assist”.

Upright preparation: It is indispensable for coaches to cover and contextualize all aspects of their subject matter from basic skills to designing and implementing leadership notions.

Presence: It is about being attentively present with clients and supporting them in achieving lasting improvement.

Clear communication skills: Clarity in communication is vital in conveying management strategies to clients. Thus, refined communication skills lead to effective coaching progression.

Continuous learning: A coach’s role is to take his client on a learning journey. This is why it is essential that he himself boards on the journey of continuous growth and development in personal and professional life.

Trustworthiness: Clients should feel assured that they can confide in their coach and that the coach-client interactional discussions will always be confidential. It is a matter of professional and ethical obligation.

“What’s really driving the boom in coaching, is this: as we move from 30 miles an hour to 70 to 120 to 180……as we go from driving straight down the road to making right turns and left turns to abandoning cars and getting motorcycles…the whole game changes, and a lot of people are trying to keep up, learn how not to fall.” ― John Kotter, Professor of Leadership, Harvard Business School

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